The 11th annual Phillips Society luncheon focused on the history and future of Cardiology, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary at Mass General.

While the 100th anniversary of Cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital inspired the hospital’s 11th annual Phillips Society luncheon topic, speakers at the Sept. 16, 2016, event focused on the future.

“Philanthropy remains key to maintaining the excellence of our academic mission.”

Physicians, hospital friends and leaders joined society members to celebrate the generosity and impact of estate and endowment giving at the hospital. The Phillips Society represents those who include Mass General in their estate plan – through a will or other planned gift – and those who make a lead gift to establish an endowed fund.

Roman DeSanctis, MD, director emeritus of Clinical Cardiology and Phillips Society member and ambassador, said that despite major advances in treatment and prevention, cardiovascular disease remains the No. 1 cause of death in the developed world. “But shrinking grants and reimbursements threaten young clinician scientists and new leaders of the field,” he said. “Philanthropy remains key to maintaining the excellence of our academic mission.”

Rapid Cardiology Advancements

Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, chief of Cardiology and co-director of the Corrigan Minehan Heart Center, discussed rapid advancements in science and technology that make this “one of the most exciting times to be in medicine.”

“This is a chance to connect with our talented researchers and clinicians and with people who are generous and want to feel good about their giving.”

Other honored speakers from varying areas of the Cardiology Division included Conor Barrett, MD, who explained a new procedure, pioneered at MGH, for patients with heart rhythm disturbances. The procedure keeps blood from pooling and clotting at the heart, thus reducing strokes.

Ami Bhatt, MD, director of the adult congenital heart disease program, outlined her vision to bring caregivers, patients and their families all closer together by incorporating social workers, wellness experts and telemedicine to stay connected to the patient year round. Jason Roh, MD, an attending cardiologist, discussed our aging population and his research into why some people age differently than others.

“This is a chance to connect with our talented researchers and clinicians and with people who are generous and want to feel good about their giving,” said Brit Nicholson, MD, senior vice president of Development. He also underscored the importance of philanthropy to Mass General’s mission. “Donors like you are clearly partners in every aspect,” he said.

For more information about the Phillips Society, please contact us.

This story was originally published by MGH Hotline.