Home Base has received a $15.7 million challenge grant as part of the launch of a unique national network designed to connect wounded veterans and their families with world-class, individualized health care.

Homebase-Wounded-WarriorWounded Warrior Project (WWP), a national nonprofit veterans’ service organization based in Jacksonville, Florida, has initiated a $100 million commitment to launch the Warrior Care Network, a first-of-its-kind national medical care network connecting wounded veterans and their families with world-class, individualized health care.

The Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program (Home Base) is one of four dedicated programs based at academic medical centers in the U.S. and the only center in the Northeast to be part of this new, national network. All four programs in the Warrior Care Network will provide services for the invisible wounds of war – post-traumatic stress (PTS), traumatic brain injury (TBI), substance abuse and other related conditions.

Over the next three years, Wounded Warrior Project has committed to expand regional outpatient programs and develop innovative two- to three-week intensive clinical programs to help veterans and their families nationwide: at Home Base as well as at Operation Mend Program at the University of California, Los Angeles; at the Road Home Program at Rush in Chicago; and Emory’s Veterans Program at Emory University in Atlanta.

Investment in Veterans

In addition to the Wounded Warrior Project grant, each institution will secure matching funds, bringing the total funding amount across all partners to over $100 million. Home Base will receive $15.7 million through a three-year challenge grant from Wounded Warrior Project.

“Since my last deployment in Afghanistan in 2012, I have lost more soldiers to the invisible wounds on the home front than I did in theater.”

“With this $15 million jumpstart, Home Base will use these grant funds to encourage our community to help match the investment WWP has made to provide care and support to our service members, veterans and their families in the compassionate, timely, and cutting edge environment that they have earned,” stated retired Brig. Gen.Jack Hammond, executive director of Home Base. “Since my last deployment in Afghanistan in 2012, I have lost more soldiers to the invisible wounds on the home front than I did in theater. As Americans, we must and can do better.”

The treatment program will integrate evidence-based behavioral health care practices, rehabilitative medicine, wellness, complementary alternative medicine, nutrition, mindfulness training, and family support. Through this cutting-edge initiative, Wounded Warrior Project and its partners plan to serve thousands of service members, wounded veterans and family members over the next three years.

To learn more about how you can support Home Base treatment programs, please contact us.